July 08, 2014

The Quiet Emergency of Financial Well-Being

Have you ever stressed about your finances? Have you worried that there’s not enough money in the bank to pay bills? Or felt like you didn’t have an idea how to pay for your child’s college education? Or simply couldn’t figure out how to retire comfortably?

If so, you’re definitely not alone. According to data from Gallup, 43 percent of American workers, if they lost their job, couldn’t go more than one month without experiencing significant financial hardship. More than a quarter (28 percent) don’t feel they currently have enough money to live comfortably. Nearly one in four (39 percent) say saving for the future just isn’t a realistic goal for them.

People at all income levels are struggling financially, with wide-ranging impact. They may not be sleeping at night, exercising or eating right, or quitting smoking even though they know they should. They may be delaying necessary medical treatment, as 30 percent of Americans have done, according to Gallup.

As a result, low financial well-being can all negatively affect the four other elements of well-being: purpose, social, community and physical. Individuals with low financial well-being are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease, depression and substance abuse, and have a lower sense of self-worth. They’re likely to restrict activity with friends and family, and reduce their involvement in their communities. In fact, this epidemic of financial distress has been dubbed the “Quiet Emergency in Healthcare” by Forbes.

The impact of poor financial well-being isn’t just limited to individuals. Employers can see higher rates of absenteeism, less on-the-job productivity, and increased health costs from their employees who are struggling financially. Low financial well-being can also impede adoption of employee wellness programs. For example, someone who is living under a mountain of credit card debt probably isn’t making losing weight a top priority. Yet, less than half of large U.S. companies have, or plan on having, a financial wellness strategy in place over the next two years and only 22 percent offer any education around debt management and budgeting to their employees. Poor financial well-being can drive up healthcare usage, creating additional costs for health plans and health systems as well.

At Healthways’ 2014 Well-Being Summit, Andres Gutierrez from the Dave Ramsey organization spoke on the issue of low financial well-being and what can be done to address it. He asserted that one reason for this crisis is ignorance – people simply don’t know enough about personal finance. This isn’t necessarily their fault; the financial services industry refuses to use “straight talk” and real language to better explain its products and services. Little wonder, then, that people make bad decisions when it comes to their money, according to Gutierrez – decisions that become increasingly worse the more trouble they’re facing (e.g., taking out payday and title loans).

So how can individuals improve their financial well-being? The Ramsey approach stresses behavior change over “head knowledge,” guiding people to adjust the way they think about and interact with their money. Using the Seven Baby Steps, complemented by a powerful combination of plain-language education and inspiration, individuals can follow a proven path to taking control of their finances. At the Summit, Gutierrez noted that if people’s financial houses are in order, then it becomes much easier for them to then focus on other aspects of their own well-being.

To learn more, read about the Ramsey approach in action in the workplace – outstanding results achieved in just 90 days.


Written by: Madison Agee

Visit the Healthways Linkedin page to add your comments.

July 03, 2014

Is Well-Being an Integral Ingredient in Your Organization’s Cultural Recipe?

This cake may look pretty, but if you left out an essential ingredient – like sugar – it’s probably going to taste awful. Similarly, omitting the key element of the right kind of organizational culture can inhibit the success of your well-being improvement program.

More organizations are looking to wellness and well-being improvement programs to help them improve productivity and manage ever-growing healthcare costs. As they invest in these types of programs, organizations logically want to maximize their returns and improve outcomes as much as possible.

But what happens when programs aren’t creating the results organizations want to see? The easy scapegoat is the design or implementation of the wellness program itself, but what organizations may underappreciate is the critical role that their own culture plays.

Consider, for a moment, baking a cake without sugar. Although it may look like a cake, it certainly wouldn’t taste like one. It’s a similar situation with culture, which is an essential ingredient in the overall recipe for well-being improvement. If you’re expecting your employees to prioritize high well-being, but your culture is working against you (for example, leaders aren’t participating in offered activities or engaging in a well-being dialog), then you’ve likely set yourself up for disappointment.

Ask yourself the following questions to better understand how well you’re actually baking well-being into the very recipe of your organization:

  • Are our underlying attitudes and assumptions reflective of a true commitment to well-being? A crucial element in a culture of well-being are the very values and rituals that are important to your organization. How is well-being actually “folded into” your core values and the ways in which colleagues interact with the organization, your leaders and one another? For instance, does your organization have an annual volunteer day that encourages employees to give back to their community?
  • Are we structurally aligned to well-being? A culture of well-being requires that your organizational structure reflect it, with programs, benefits and activities that encourage and enhance well-being. If you’re not offering these kinds of things, you could be at risk of simply “talking the talk” and not “walking the walk.” What kinds of things, such as providing a tobacco cessation program or launching an organization-wide “steps challenge,” are you doing to improve well-being within your organization?
  •  Are we actively supporting our employees’ well-being? In the absence of continuous support for your employees’ individual well-being journeys, your employees could actually perceive you as actively discouraging them. Real encouragement takes place in an environment where people are not only openly talking about well-being improvement, but actually caring if their colleagues are working towards it. If co-workers aren’t saying “good for you” when a team member decides not to check email on a long-awaited family vacation, you may have an unsupportive culture.
  • Are our leaders modeling the right behaviors? The role of leadership in creating and supporting a culture of well-being can’t be understated. Take a close look at what your leaders are saying – and doing – on a regular basis to better gauge whether they’re shoring up or undermining your culture of well-being. Are they, for example, always wearing a suit on days when you allow your employees to wear workout clothes?
  • Are we properly incentivizing or encouraging well-being behaviors? Behavior change is not easy for most people – typically employees may need to be urged or incentivized to participate in activities and programs that enhance their well-being. What’s your organization doing to create this sense of excitement and desire among your employees that helps them along on their journey to better well-being?

By asking yourself the questions above, you can get a much better sense of how truly integral well-being is to your organizational culture. We’ve assembled some additional questions you can use to better benchmark where your organization currently stands, as well as guidance to help you develop your own action plan for creating a culture of well-being.

In a June webinar, experts from Gallup and Healthways explored the topic of well-being cultures in more detail, and shared some great insights into how organizations can create start or enhance their own journeys. Download the webinar recording to learn more.


Written by: Madison Agee

Visit the Healthways Linkedin page to add your comments.

June 24, 2014

More Engagement with Weight Loss Program Fosters Success, New Study Shows

Studies of weight loss programs in a clinical setting benefit from a tidy combination of elements, such as carefully controlled environments, rigorous processes and structured selection criteria for participants. That’s why it’s so important to examine any program in a real-world setting as well a clinical one – you need to make sure it’s going to work when you can’t quite plan for everything.

The creators of the Innergy™ program, Johns Hopkins Medicine and Healthways, knew that they needed to do just that. A sustained weight loss program, Innergy was borne out of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) sponsored clinical Practice-based Opportunities for Weight Reduction (POWER) trial. The two organizations wanted to advance the science of the successful POWER trial and gauge the weight loss program’s real-world efficacy.

A new study, “Initial Evaluation of a Scalable Lifestyle Program for Sustained Weight Loss,” published in the online Journal of Obesity and Weight Loss Therapy, demonstrates Innergy’s effectiveness in a non-clinical setting. Specifically, the study shows that, in the real-world environment of a mid-sized employer, Innergy can result in statistically significant weight loss. Program participants lost an average of 6.8 pounds per person over the six-month period of the study. Even better, nearly a quarter of the 265 participants lost 5 percent or more of their starting weight.

Perhaps unsurprisingly but definitively, the study also found that weight loss increased in proportion to how much participants engaged with the program. Researchers measured level of engagement by both how long participants remained engaged and how frequently they interacted with the program:

  • Participants still active with the program in the sixth month of the study had an average weight loss of 11.5 pounds and 5 percent of their starting weight.
  • Participants who took advantage of a broader range of program support elements – had more coaching calls, regularly used the website, and tracked their weight and exercise – were much more successful in shedding pounds. In fact, participants who interacted more than the study median with all five program support components lost an average of 5.7 percent of their starting weight.

The study also provided Innergy’s creators with valuable insight into how to make the weight loss program even better. Because the study demonstrated the critical importance of member commitment to weight loss, program designers updated and strengthened enrollment criteria to better assess a member’s readiness to change. Research data also revealed the essential role that re-engagement methods play following a period of inactivity, re-engagement tactics were both updated and added.

Innergy is a 24-month program, consisting of a six-month weight loss period and an 18-month maintenance period. The authors will continue to monitor the study population through the maintenance period.

One of the motives for developing Innergy was to help combat the epidemic of obesity. To learn more about this issue, download a copy of Healthways’ Well-Being Insights article, “Addressing America’s Obesity Epidemic: Practical, Flexible Weight Management Capabilities for a Spectrum of Needs.”


Written by: Madison Agee

Visit the Healthways Linkedin page to add your comments.

June 20, 2014

“Population Well-Being” Capabilities Come to Independent Physicians in North Texas

gty_dallas_kb_140321_16x9_992Imagine, for a minute, what it must be like to be a physician. You spent all those hard years in school because you wanted to help people live long, healthy, productive lives. And then you start practicing medicine, and probably fairly quickly come to realize that there is only so much you can do to fulfill your mission because you can’t sustainably influence what is often the underlying cause of illness: lives lived short of their potential.

Physicians see the impacts of stress, loneliness and isolation. They understand that their patients don’t need another lecture on losing weight or stopping smoking because they already know these things are bad for their health. They’re well aware that once their patients leave their office, their attempts to change their lifestyles to improve their physical well-being will often fall short. Pressures at work, financial worries, lack of support and encouragement, and so many other concerns create barriers to change that physicians typically are powerless to address, particularly across their entire patient population.

Healthways has teamed up with the largest independent physicians association in North Texas, Genesis Physicians Group (GPG), to directly address this issue. You can read about it in HealthLeaders, or read our press release here. We just wanted to take a minute to share how excited we are about our new joint venture, GenHealth.

Ben R. Leedle, Jr., Healthways’ president and chief executive officer, summed up the news:

“Not only are physicians the most trusted, credible influencers of individual health behaviors, but an individual’s bond with his or her physician is one of the most enduring. As healthcare continues to transform in response to untenable healthcare costs, poor overall health, and weaker competitive positions for American companies and communities, innovative healthcare providers such as GPG are assuming more financial and quality outcomes risk for their patient populations. In so doing, they are embracing a scientifically proven approach that has well-being – not sick care – at its core. We firmly believe that by directly supporting the patient-physician relationship with well-being improvement solutions, we will create faster, more sustained engagement in order to proactively reduce the causes and effects of disease and achieve significantly greater impacts on medical savings, productivity and performance.”

 


Written by: Sandy Cummings

Visit the Healthways Linkedin page to add your comments.

June 17, 2014

Bringing the Promise of Well-Being to New Markets

Once upon a time, if you thought about a person pursuing “well-being,” that may have generated a certain image in your mind: someone who has lots of disposable income, shops at Whole Foods, lives in a suburban community conducive to outdoor exercise, attends exclusive yoga classes in expensive workout wear, is likely under the age of 50 … and so on. Insight from the recent Healthways 2014 Well-Being Summit indicates that this image is rapidly changing.

At the Summit, the founders of Feel Rich, Quincy Jones III and Shawn Ullman, discussed their company’s mission to bring the message of better well-being to minority and urban communities. These markets have historically been underserved with authentic, connected messaging that educates and excites them about taking steps to improve their well-being.

To achieve their mission, the two entrepreneurs utilize engaging multimedia content delivered by hip-hop artists who are considered trustworthy messengers of change. These artists – many of whom are committed to healthy lifestyles (did you know the rapper Common is a vegan fitness enthusiast?) – promote better well-being to the African-American and Latino markets through relatable imagery and authentic language.

Jones and Ullman’s approach also allows well-being brands that are looking to gain entrance into or further penetrate these markets to connect to their target consumers in a more genuine way. For example, they spearheaded the Johnson & Johnson “Text4Baby” campaign, which provided expecting and new mothers with health advice and information for both themselves and their babies. The mothers were inspired to receive the texts with a promise of a personal lullaby for their new baby sung by actor-model-musical artist Tyrese.

Older adults, too, are tuning in to well-being in growing numbers. Joseph Coughlin of the MIT AgeLab provided the Well-Being Summit audience with an interesting overview of some of the demographics and trends of this expanding population. Generally speaking, this market:

  • Considers itself ill, but not sick — e.g., “I may have high blood pressure, but I’m doing just fine”
  • Has at least some college education
  • Values having health and ability and freedom to still live active lives
  • Is skeptical of information, preferring testimonials and advice from others like them
  • Is committed to working or required to work as long as they can — 40 percent plan to “work until they drop”
  • Is overloaded by information, which is often contradictory
  • Is relatively isolated — 30 percent of people 60+ live alone, and 70 percent of 50+ live in rural areas

Coughlin pointed out that traditional methods of delivering a well-being message to seniors, which are predicated on facts, fear and a prescriptive “this is what’s good for you” approach, don’t work. Instead, organizations and brands trying to reach this demographic should use a more fun, social-oriented framework that:

  •  Leverages social networks
  • Speaks in terms of solutions, not just data
  • Encourages life performance instead of illness management
  • Is personal and authentic
  • Is constructed to enable a longer life span versus getting a senior through this life stage

Connecting with these two “non-traditional” markets for well-being products and services – urban/minority and seniors – requires that brands take a new approach. In both instances, authenticity and social engagement are critically important.


Written by: Madison Agee

Visit the Healthways Linkedin page to add your comments.

June 10, 2014

Should You Be Emphasizing “Feminine” Values at Your Organization?

According to New York Times best-selling author and corporate consultant John Gerzema, the values that we traditionally associate with femininity – such as nurture, empathy, collaboration and flexibility – are the “operating system of the 21st century.” As he recently discussed at Healthways’ 2014 Well-Being Summit, where he connected well-being to leadership and consumer trends, most people already think these feminine values are of great importance, a trend that will only continue to grow in the future.

In the book, The Athena Doctrine: How Women (and the Men Who Think Like Them) Will Rule the Future, which Gerzema co-authored by Michael D’Antonio, the authors explore this idea in detail. Their research, which took into account surveys of 64,000 people in 13 countries around the world, reveals some interesting insight into what people believe to be important and the values and approaches they feel will benefit themselves, their families, communities and workplaces, and the greater good.

Results from the surveys indicate that two-thirds of people think the world would be a better place if men thought like women. More than half (57 percent) are also frustrated with the conduct of men. The authors then split their original survey group of 64,000 into two halves and asked the first half to classify 125 human traits (e.g., “confident,” “visionary,” “adaptive”) according to whether the traits were masculine, feminine or neither. They then asked the other half to rank the same 125 traits (which were not given any gender association) based on how those traits relate to leadership, success, morality and happiness.

Conclusions from their research led the authors to assert that people all over the world are looking for more “feminine” leaders – leaders whose power stems more from gentle influence and persuasion than autocratic control. Gerzema and D’Antonio also concluded that feminine values are on the rise, and that people now prefer these values to those historically associated with masculinity.

Gerzema provided Summit attendees with both the results of their research and examples of how this rise of feminine values is being played out in far-flung corners of the world. He discussed how businesses and organizations all over the world are rejecting traditional models associated with masculinity and instead emphasizing these more feminine approaches to leadership, work and productivity – and achieving incredible success from doing so.

Traits such as empathy, collaboration, inclusion and humility are helping organizations achieve their business goals. As surprising evidence of this shift in thinking, Gerzema shared that 67 percent of survey participants indicated that they would work for less money at a company in which they truly believed, upturning the classic model that people are primarily motivated by money. Clearly, liking what you do each day and being motivated to achieve your goals — in other words, having a sense of purpose — is a significant contributor to well-being. To learn more about the importance of well-being, download the Gallup-Healthways State of American Well-Being Report.


Written by: Madison Agee

Visit the Healthways Linkedin page to add your comments.

June 04, 2014

Well-Being as Brand: 10 Examples

Well-being is everywhere these days – people are talking, reading and thinking about it. And companies are paying attention, looking to leverage this ever-growing movement to attract new customers, grow their businesses and position themselves for future opportunity. Jennifer Pfahler, an expert in the consumer health, wellness and lifestyle market, says that well-being is now well-entrenched within the DNA of many consumer brands.

Pfahler’s recent presentation at the Healthways 2014 Well-Being Summit provided attendees with an overview of this phenomenon, including a discussion of “why well-being?” and “what’s it worth?”. To demonstrate the scope of this ever-growing trend, she offered several examples of consumer-oriented brands that are adopting well-being as part of their marketing and product strategy.

  1. Activia. Activia is marketed not only as a delicious yogurt, but one with probiotics that promote and support digestive health.
  2. bedMATCH. Spending on sleep-related products continues to grow, and bedMATCH is taking advantage of the opportunity by offering a scientifically based system for helping consumers find the right mattress for their specific needs.
  3. EVEN Hotels. IHG is launching this new brand designed to attract travelers interested in health and wellness, with features such as in-room workout options and healthy food and beverage choices.
  4. fitmob. This company uses social networking to connect individuals within a community to one another and group exercise opportunities led by a professional fitness trainer – all enhanced by a pricing structure that rewards additional workouts.
  5. iCouch. Leveraging the power of online video, iCouch allows mental health professionals to provide counseling and therapy services to individuals from the comfort of their homes.
  6. Dove. Dove’s recent marketing campaigns have centered on “Real Beauty,” encouraging self-acceptance and self-love among women of all ages, shapes, sizes and races.
  7. Oral-B. This established oral care brand has started to utilize the language of well-being to demonstrate the importance of oral health and its link to a broad range of other aspects of total well-being.
  8. CVS. This leading drugstore recently made the newsworthy decision to no longer stock or sell tobacco products in its retail outlets, despite a projected revenue loss of $2 billion per year.
  9. Kind. The brand not only uses health-conscious ingredients in its snacks, but encourages people to perform random acts of kindness and generosity – “Do the Kind Thing.”
  10. Suja. The line of cold-pressed juices is marketed as helping people “live a long, beautiful life.”

You’ve probably seen many of other examples of companies leveraging the concept and language of well-being to evolve their brands and attract consumers who are interested in a happier, more health-conscious lifestyle. According to Pfahler, doing so helps them achieve the “three Ps”:

  1. Improve their positioning, with well-being as a market differentiator
  2. Increase profits and drive commercial success
  3. Have a purpose

Pfahler believes that more B2C companies will join the well-being movement, and this will likely drive brands in the B2B space to consider a similar approach.


Written by: Madison Agee

Visit the Healthways Linkedin page to add your comments.

May 23, 2014

E-Cigarettes: The Next Best Thing in Smoke-Free Environments?

By Ann Wendling, MD, MPH
Medical Director, Tobacco Cessation, Healthways

In just a few years, e-cigarettes have advanced from difficult-to-find novelty to readily available commodity widely marketed as a healthier alternative to cigarettes. But with research and regulatory action struggling to keep pace, what do we really know about e-cigarettes?

Food for thought

E-cigarettes, whether manufactured in China or the United States, are not subject to production and content regulation, leading to a multitude of products with inconsistent nicotine delivery and complicating any research on safety and effectiveness.

Usage is increasing dramatically among both youth and adults – about 7% for both in 2012. Alarmingly, a Legacy for Health February 2014 survey found current e-cigarette use at 9% for ages 13-17 and 29% for ages 18-21. Dual use with conventional cigarettes predominates.

Limited population studies and clinical trails have not shown quit efficacy or effectiveness. However, recent data from a survey of almost 6,000 recently quit smokers in England, published on May 21, suggested a promising real-world effectiveness of 1.6 times for e-cigarettes compared to over-the-counter nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and 1.4 times compared to unaided cessation.

Safety studies have had variable results:

  • We know ultrafine particles, dependent on the presence of nicotine, are small enough to reach deep into the lungs and subsequently the systemic circulation.
  • Cytotoxicity is variable among products and can be related to the concentration and number of flavorings.
  • Exposure to e-cigarette aerosol, often containing glycerin or propylene glycol, can cause throat and mouth irritation, cough, nausea, vomiting and increased airway resistance. No long-term safety data have yet been collected.
  • Secondhand exposure to nicotine as well as other toxins in the vapor has been detected in several studies, albeit usually at lower concentrations than secondhand smoke.

The public health effect

If indeed smoking cessation were as simple as switching from conventional cigarettes to e-cigarettes, undoubtedly there would be significant benefit to the public’s health. But it is not this simple.

Up to a third of youth have only used e-cigarettes. Will this set them on a trajectory toward a lifelong addiction to nicotine and eventually conventional cigarettes?

In addition, most adults are dual users – are they using e-cigarettes to vape in smoke-free environments or to cut down on more costly conventional cigarettes, believing they are at less risk for smoking-related disease? Data do not necessarily support the latter premise. If e-cigarettes delay total abstinence, the health burden may actually increase.

Until clean indoor air policies universally include bans on e-cigarette use (only three states have them to date), there is increasing risk for social acceptance/normalization of smoking/vaping behavior. Fortunately, more states are on board with limiting sales to minors.

What’s on the horizon?

If we follow the same course as the past couple years, we can expect continuing exponential growth in e-cigarette consumption. Fortunately, on April 24, 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) took the first step toward regulation by proposing a Deeming Regulation to assert jurisdiction over other tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. Unfortunately, the regulation does not include limits on marketing/advertising and flavor additives attractive to youth and will take up to several years for some of the regulations to take effect.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, according to recently released guidance, requires most health plans to cover FDA-approved smoking cessation products and counseling without any out-of-pocket cost to consumers. E-cigarettes, not proven or approved as cessation tools, will not be covered. This may not be a significant barrier to the escalating use unless more states tax e-cigarettes at a level comparable to conventional cigarettes.

Many questions remain unanswered. How will e-cigarettes be viewed by health plans and employers? Will vapers be considered tobacco users and pay higher healthcare premiums?

The next several years will yield much needed data on the safety and efficacy of e-cigarettes while we observe a natural experiment of “free-range” marketing, easy access and escalating use and wait for guidance and regulation. Until then, the evidence supports a combination of behavioral therapy and FDA-approved cessation aides to assist tobacco users in quitting.

References

Grana R, Benowitz N, and Glantz SA. “E-Cigarettes: A Scientific Review.” Circulation 129:1972-1986, 2014.

Brown J, Beard E, Kotz D, Michie S and West R. “Real-world effectiveness of e-cigarettes when used to aid smoking cessation: A cross-sectional population study.” Addiction 109: doi: 10.1111/add.12623, 2014.

Legacy for Health. “Vaporized: E-Cigarettes, Advertising, and Youth.” Report. May 2014.

Andrews M. “E-Cigarette Users May End Up Paying More For Insurance.” Kaiser Health News. May 20, 2014.


Written by: Sandy Cummings

Visit the Healthways Linkedin page to add your comments.

May 19, 2014

Five Hits of Community Well-Being for June

The weather’s looking good, and it’s time to get out and enjoy it. Here’s a quick list of community events to help improve your well-being in June.

June 6 – National Yo-Yo Day 

National Yo-Yo Day is the perfect day to get out your yo-yo and have some fun playing “Sleeper,” “Walk the Dog” and “Shooting the Moon.” Believed to be invented in ancient Greece, the Yo-Yo became popular in America when Donald F. Duncan Sr. manufactured the “Duncan Yo-Yo” in the early 1900s. You can visit the National Yo-Yo Museum in Chico, California.

June 7 – National Trails Day

National Trails Day is a celebration of America’s magnificent trail system and features a series of outdoor activities designed to promote the importance of the 200,000 miles of trails in the United States. Trails provide access to the natural world for recreation, education, exploration, solitude and inspiration, and they give us a means to support good physical and mental health. Pick a trail and breathe fresh air, get your heart pumping, and escape from stress.

Individuals, clubs and organizations from around the country host a wide array of trail activities: hiking, biking, paddling, horseback riding, trail running, bird watching and more. Check out the website for an official event being held near you.

Heath Jones

Heath Jones, Healthways Coach-of-the-Year and member of the Innergy team at Healthways’ Seattle Well-Being Improvement Center, is “Stepping It Up” in June as he gets ready for a 40-mile hike in Yosemite over Fourth of July weekend. In preparation, Heath will be hiking by himself or with a group every week, mountain biking twice with his friend Nick, logging at least four miles on the step-mill at the gym each week, and continuing his regular strength training routine. That’s Heath training in the great outdoors of the Pacific Northwest! 

June 14 – National Get Outdoors Day

National Get Outdoors Day encourages healthy, active outdoor fun. Prime goals of the day are to reach first-time visitors to public lands and reconnect youth to the outdoors. Participating partners will offer opportunities for families to experience traditional and non-traditional types of outdoor activities.

June 19 – National Recess at Work Day

Rich DiGirolamo, founder of Recess at Work, believes that to keep people engaged, loyal and productive, you need to create a work environment that is fun. But having fun at work and being a fun place to work are two very different things. Recess at Work is an opportunity to create team spirit, engage employees, increase morale, improve health and wellness, and share your fun side with your colleagues.

June 28 – Great American Backyard Campout

The Great American Backyard Campout is a part of the National Wildlife Federation’s efforts to help inspire Americans to protect wildlife, including a three-year campaign to get 10 million kids to spend regular outdoor time in nature. Thousands of people across the nation will gather in their backyards, neighborhoods, communities and parks to take part in this annual event that provides a fun-filled evening for all generations to get outside and connect with nature.


Written by: Sandy Cummings

Visit the Healthways Linkedin page to add your comments.

May 15, 2014

Need to Kick It Up a Notch with Your Wellness Program?

Our friends over at Gallup have compiled some intriguing research, as always, about why corporate wellness programs often fall short of their goals — plus what employers can do to turn things around. Check out this infographic:

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Discouraging data, given that programs designed to improve employee well-being have been shown to lower healthcare costs and improve employee productivity.

What steps can employers take to improve participation? Gallup researchers highlight the key role of managers in building awareness and trust, encouraging their teams to take part, and creating accountability for results. They also point out that programs that take well-being improvement beyond just the physical element — in other words, that also work to elevate social, financial, community and purpose well-being — have greater impact: 

When comparing adults who are thriving in just Physical Well-Being with those thriving in all five elements, those in the latter group:

  • report 41% fewer unhealthy days
  • are more than twice as likely to say they always adapt well to change
  • are 36% more likely to say they always fully bounce back after an illness
  • are 23% more likely to donate money
  • are 43% more likely to have volunteered
  • are 65% less likely to be involved in a workplace accident
  • are 81% less likely to look for a new job when the job market improves

Read the full article here.


Written by: Sandy Cummings

Visit the Healthways Linkedin page to add your comments.